Uncertain territory. The strange life and curious sustainability of de facto states (by Thomas de Waal) 26 April 2018 In his new essay, Thomas de Waal raises a challenging question about the unexpected persistence of unrecognized post-Soviet states, as well as Northern Cyprus, which managed to establish regular civil life despite being more or less de-jure cut off from the world. He mentions that none of...

Dramatic perturbations have recently occurred in the British government. But what does all this chaos stand for? We spoke to our expert Murad Muradov on the issue.   What stands behind the recent turmoil within the British government?  Why have Ministers Davis and Johnson resigned? As it is the case with most of the turbulent events in British politics, the trigger is definitely the Brexit...

Global Supply Chains Are Dangerously Easy to Snap (by Elisabeth Braw) 7 August 2018 UK’s stockpiling plans in case a no-deal Brexit and the reasons why other developed countries depending on complex supply chains should take Britain’s misfortune as a wake-up call are being discussed in this article. Global supply chains in a modern world are a national security issue. Although thanks to a...

Immigration policy should be generous; it should be fair; it should be flexible. With such a policy we can turn to the world, and to our own past, with clean hands and a clear conscience.  John Fitzgerald Kennedy, “A Nation of Immigrants”, 1958   The long-brewing Civil War in Syria that blasted out to engender a mass movement of refugees in 2015 has created a long trajectory of...

Greece exits its bail-out programme, but its marathon has further to go 2 August 2018 The Economist discusses the current state of Greek economy which has recently been emboldened by two years of GDP growth and the official termination of the third, last round of the IMF bailout pending this August. However, long-term structural problems- low productivity, weak economic dynamic, not particularly...

A safari for Wagner (by Andrey Kamakin) 13 July 2018 This piece, first published in June 2018, has been republished following the tragic death of   three Russian journalists of the highest caliber in Central African Republic. The author discusses the role of so-called “Wagner”, a private military unit now ubiquitously claimed to be on the forefront of Russian geopolitical affairs but...

Marxist world (by Robin Varghese) 14 June 2018 Robin Varghese argues in this essay that the Marxist theory, despite its obvious shortcomings, managed to predict with astonishing precision the essential problems of contemporary capitalism: inequality rising despite of growing efficiency and stagnant or falling living standards of the absolute majority due to the “race to the bottom” in terms of...

Germany is Western Europe‘s demographically and economically most significant country while Ukraine has, in the post-Soviet period, becomea geopolitical pivot state of Eastern Europe as well as the territorially largest exclusively European country (Russia and Turkey have parts of their territories in Europe, but most of them in Asia). There are deep historical links between Ukrainian and Germans....

Macron Has Changed France’s Political DNA (by James Traub) 5 June 2018 James Traub, contemplating about the major outcomes of the first year of Emmanuel Macron’s presidency in France, claims that he has managed to bring a substantially new approach to the country’ politics. Being rightly seen as technocratic and a supporter of top-down governance, Macron, in order to overcome the...

A coin for the U.S.-North Korea summit. May, 2018. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)    South-East Asia: lots of elections, not so much democracy 26 May 2018 The Economist piece emphasizes the lack of democracy in South-East Asia and states while only one state can be categorized as wholly free (East Timor), remaining countries are either partly free or not free at all. The author also states that this...

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